Routine Tooth Extractions - Green Dental

Routine Tooth Extraction

Routine Tooth Extractions

The specific steps of a tooth extraction procedure will depend on whether the type of procedure. A simple tooth extraction is done when the entire tooth is visible and can be removed in one piece. A surgical extraction is performed when part or all of the tooth is beneath the gum line and has to be extracted as several pieces. To ease your anxiety about routine tooth extractions, here is a brief overview of the main stages/steps that you should expect before, during, and after the appointment.

Preparation

The first step of the tooth extraction process starts with a consultation with Dr. Chris Green. During that consultation, the best dentist in Parker, CO will take your full dental and medical history.

Your dentist will also ask you about any medications that you are currently taking. You may be asked to stop taking some of those medications, or you may be advised to start taking additional medications in preparation for the upcoming tooth extraction procedure.

Stopping Blood Thinners

If you are currently taking blood thinners, those medications could make you bleed excessively at the tooth extraction site since they prevent a blood clot from forming. However, it isn’t a given that your Parker, CO dentist will advise you to stop taking this medication since Dr. Chris Green has several options to promote the formation of a clot. They include topical blood clotting medications, stitching the tooth extraction site, and packing dissolvable gauze into the empty socket after the tooth has been removed. Nevertheless, you need to let the team at Green Dental Care know if you take blood thinners so that appropriate planning can be undertaken for the tooth extraction.

Taking Antibiotics

In some cases, your dentist will recommend that patients take antibiotics prior to a tooth extraction procedure. For instance, some dentists recommend that you take antibiotics if you have a dental infection that had triggered generalized symptoms (fever and malaise, for example). Patients with pre-existing heart conditions, such as those with a prosthetic heart valve, may also take antibiotics before undergoing any dental surgery. This is why your medical history is so important during your consultation at Green Dental Care before your tooth is extracted.

Administering An Anesthetic

Usually, a local anesthetic is sufficient for patients who are scheduled for tooth extractions. However, you may request additional anesthetics, such as nitrous oxide or even general anesthesia if you suffer from dental anxiety or have another condition that makes you prefer sedation dentistry. At Green Dental Care, we offer sedation dentistry and can accommodate the needs of patients who need this service.

The Extraction Procedure

If you need surgical tooth extraction, Dr. Chris Green will take a dental X-ray to see the angle and curvature of the root of that tooth. Once the anesthetic kicks in, the extraction will begin. He may cut through gum or bone tissue in order to remove the tooth. You shouldn’t feel any pain, and it is vital that you inform your dentist or oral surgeon if you do.

Stitches or other methods may be used to stop bleeding once the tooth is out. When a gauze pad is placed at the extraction site, the aftercare phase begins.

The Tooth Extraction Aftercare Phase

You can do several things to promote healing and reduce your discomfort after having a tooth extracted. Here are some tips our friend, and the best dentist in Georgetown, KY, Dr. Kristina Neda recommends: 

1. Controlling Pain

The anesthetic should wear off a few hours after the extraction. Inform Dr. Chris Green if it persists long after you have reached home. You may also feel some discomfort and soreness in the days after the procedure. However, over-the-counter pain medication can address that, or talk to your dentist for a pain medication prescription if Ibuprofen and other OTC medications are unable to relieve your discomfort.

2. Controlling Swelling

It is normal to have some swelling on the side of your face after a tooth extraction, and an ice pack is helpful in relieving that swelling.

3. Protecting The Extraction Site

It is important that you protect the tooth extraction site from disturbance in the first 24 hours after the extraction. Any disturbance could jeopardize the clot-formation process or dislodge the clot formed. The protective measures include refraining from smoking or using a straw. Don’t suck on the extraction site, and don’t move your tongue over the site. Dr. Chris Green will give you a comprehensive list of do’s and don’ts to protect the extraction site once your tooth is removed.

It is also important for you to discuss any possible complications with your dentist. Complications can include dry socket, which may arise, and what you can do to prevent or address them when they arise.

Green Dental Care & Tooth Extractions

At Green Dental Care, we give our patients detailed information about any dental procedure that we recommend so that the patients can make informed decisions and do their part to improve the outcomes of the procedure. If you have a nagging tooth, contact Dr. Chris Green and he will assess its condition before discussing the options available to you. Tooth extraction is a measure of last resort. Let us do what we can to save your tooth before we recommend extraction.

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